April TBR

April is shaping up to be a busy month on my blog. Not only am I focusing on a theme for the blog, but I’m planning on celebrating National Library Week , Dewey’s 24 hour Readathon the last weekend of the month, and it’s also National Poetry Month. I will post poems on all my social media and here on the blog. I hope I’m able to keep up.

To shake up things a bit for my blog I’m focusing most of my bookish posts and memes on the Brontë Sisters and their novels. I am planning to write about TV adaptations of their novels and their poetry, too. I think it could be fun  for me to write, and hopefully read, about the Brontës.

TBR:

Here is my list of books I’m planning on reading this month. I’ve not included the books I’m planning on reading during the readathon because I’m still thinking about that final list. I’ll write more about it later on in the month.

The Witches: Salem 1692 by Stacy Schiff. Sigh. I’ve had this on my currently reading list since last October. I like this book, but I needed to set it aside to complete all my reading challenges in the Fall. I want to get back into it, but I’ll probably need to start it all over again.

Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay by Elena Ferrante

Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place by Terry Tempest Williams  I’m reading this for the Book Riot Reading Challenge this year.

Vampires in the Lemon Grove by Karen Russell.  I’m reading this one too for the Book Riot Reading Challenge.

The Tenant of Wildfell Hall by Anne Brontë.  I haven’t read any of Anne Brontë’s novels, so this is sort of a requirement for this month’s theme!

Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë It’s been a number of years since I read this and I need to read it for a bookish post later on this month.

What are your reading and blogging plans for April? Have you ever had a theme for your blog? How did it work out? Would you do it again? Be sure to let me know in the comments below!

Friday 56, #12

It’s time for  Friday 56!  It’s a book meme hosted by Freda at Freda’s Voice. Be sure to visit her blog if you would like to participate!

From Freda’s Voice The Rules:
*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader
(If you have to improvise, that’s ok.)
*Find any sentence, (or few, just don’t spoil it)
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post in the Linky on Friday 56. Add the post url, not your blog url.
*It’s that simple!

Here’s my contribution:

Bird Box

From her struggle, cold river water splashes into the boat. That Girl shrieks. Malorie tells herself, Ask the man how far back he saw it. Maybe the madness hasn’t set in. Maybe it’s slower with him. Maybe he will perform one final act of benevolence before he loses all sense of reality.

This book is up next on my TBR, and I hear its a creepy, scary read that’s perfect for Halloween! So, what do you think? Would you read this book based on the excerpt? Have you read it? What are your thoughts about it? Let me know what you think in the comments below. And happy reading!

Friday 56, #9

It’s time for  Friday 56!  It’s a book meme hosted by Freda at Freda’s Voice. Be sure to visit her blog if you would like to participate!

From Freda’s Voice The Rules:
*Grab a book, any book.
*Turn to page 56 or 56% in your eReader
(If you have to improvise, that’s ok.)
*Find any sentence, (or few, just don’t spoil it)
*Post it.
*Add your (url) post in the Linky on Friday 56. Add the post url, not your blog url.
*It’s that simple!

Here’s my contribution:

I Am America (And So Can You!)

And I’ll give Mormonism this: They know which way the wind blows. When America decided polygamy wasn’t the way to go, the Mormons changed their ways and banned it. They had similar changes in policy when public opinion turned against the tradition of massacring pioneers and believing Black people are evil. Pretty much whenever the general populace decides the Mormons are a crazy, sinful cult, their leader receives a message straight from God that makes everything OK. This practice continues to this day; you can see it in the way Mitt Romney was pro-choice when he was running for governor of Massachusetts, but was divinely inspired to become pro-life when he was running for the Republican nomination for president.

Well, after finding this excerpt for the Friday 56, I’m pretty sure this book will count for the 2016 Read Harder Challenge task read a book about politics!

Have you read this book? Did you enjoy it? Be sure to leave a link to your Friday 56 in the comments below (And Daniela, go ahead do your own Friday 56 in my comments!)

WWW Wednesday, June 29th

img_1384-0Welcome to WWW Wednesday! This meme is hosted by  Taking on a World of Words. Just answer the three questions below and leave a link to your post in the comments for others to look at. No blog? Just leave a comment. Please, take some time to visit the other participants and see what others are reading. So, let’s get to it!

The Three Ws are:

What are you currently reading?
What did you recently finish reading?
What do you think you’ll read next?

What are you currently reading? I’m trying to finish S. by J.J. Abrams, Doug Dorst. Its really interesting with a fascinating idea behind it. It’s interactive! There are notes in the margins, stuff tucked between the pages which contribute to the whole story. It sort of reminds of Lost, if that makes sense. I want to finish it before I start a new book.

What did you recently finish reading? Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel. Such a good book. 5 Stars! Click here for my review.

What do you think you’ll read next? The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry: Love, The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry: Love, Laughter, and Tears at the World's Most Famous Cooking School in ParisLaughter, and Tears at the World’s Most Famous Cooking School in Paris by Kathleen Flinn. I need to read something for the Read Harder Challenge and this has been in my TBR pile for a while.

 

 

Have you read any of this books? What did you think of them? Let me know in the comments. What are you reading?

 

 

It’s Monday, What are You Reading? June 20th

badgeLast week I didn’t get much reading done because I needed to do stuff and I participated in #WeekofReveiws challenge hosted by Andi at Estella’s Revenge. And I manged two write seven reviews!  If you would like to read my reviews, click here, here, here, here, here, and here.  It was a really gun challenge and helped me jump start my writing.

This week I’m determined to read. And I’m reading a book Ive been looking forward to for  a year or more: Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel. I’ve seen good things about it all over the interwebs and from readers in my own house. I love dystopian novels so much! Plus, this book will also count towards the Read Harder 2016 challenge. When I finish Station Eleven I plan on starting The Sharper the Knife, the Less You Cry by Kathleen Flinn.

Station Eleven                      The Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry: Love, Laughter, and Tears at the World's Most Famous Cooking School in Paris

 

 

 

Review of Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife

Click to Read More!This is day seven of the #WeekofReveiws #Reviewathon challenge hosted by Andi at Estella’s Revenge.  If you would like to read my earlier reviews click here , herehere, here, and here. And click here if you would like to see my star rating system. Also be sure to visit Estella’s Revenge to read Andi’s reviews and links to #WeekofReviews by other bloggers participating in this challenge.

Spook: Science Tackles the Afterlife by Mary Roach      Spook by Mary Roach

  • Pub. Date: 2005
  • Publisher: W.W. Norton & Co.
  • Format: Kindle
  • pages: 321
  • Source: Amazon
  • 3 1/2 stars

Mary Roach is known for her well-researched, nonfiction books. And they are fascinating by all accounts. In Spook she asks the question is there life after death? And the book is her answer to this question. As a researcher she knows that getting background information is important. So she examines what religion says about it, including Egyptian beliefs, reincarnation,and Christian beliefs. And she examines the beginning of mediums and speaking to the dead. This last bit is fascinating. The story of the Fox sisters and the industry they spawned is beyond belief. She also examines how science has attempted to discover if there is life after death.

This is a fun read. Roach’s writing is fun and easy to read. This is not at all like reading a dense scientific journal article or college textbook. There is a wryness without being too snarky. And she treats the subject seriously without being too serious. And she does a good job of explaining the more difficult concepts without writing down to the reader. Now, you must have a strong stomach because she does not shy away from gross or nasty details. I’m still not right after reading her description of how mediums in the 19th century made and deployed ectoplasm. I’ll say no more. But it is all fascinating.

 

 

 

 

Reviews of Beautiful Ruins and Rooms

Click to Read More!This is day six of the #WeekofReveiws #Reviewathon challenge hosted by Andi at Estella’s Revenge. I missed posting a review yesterday, so I’m doubling up today. If you would like to read my earlier reviews click here , herehere  and here. And click here if you would like to see my star rating system. Also be sure to visit Estella’s Revenge to read Andi’s reviews and links to #WeekofReviews by other bloggers participating in this challenge.

Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walters

  • Pub. Date: 2012
  • Publisher: Harper Perennial
  • Format: Trade paperback
  • pages: 337
  • Source: bookstore!
  • 4 stars

I’ve had this book in ye olde TBR for a couple of years. I bought it because I love, love, love gossipy old Hollywood stories. And this one is just that. Now, let me be clear. It is fictional. Richard Burton shows up, but that is about it. There are mentions of Elizabeth Taylor, too. But this is a novel. The main characters are all fiction.

In April of 1962 Dee Moray escapes her dangerous on set love affair with Richard Burton to a small hotel on the coast of Italy owned by Pasquale. The two are both fragile and need kindness from someone. Both are rejected by their loves, you see. In spite of their difficulties in communicating, they find that understanding with each other.

Skipping 40 years forward, Dee’s son Patrick is searching for himself. He is a half-assed musician who goes through women by the score. He needs to find himself. Around this same time, Pasquale’s wife has died and he travels to Hollywood to find his lost love Dee Moray. And at the same-time A young man from Northern California is traveling to Hollywood to try and sell a script. All of these stories  come together and make sense at the end. And do it all beautifully, too. This is a perfect read for a hot weekend when you can’t get out of town. And it’s gossipy. Which for me is always fun.

Rooms by Lauren Oliver

  • Pub. Date: 2014
  • Publisher:  Ecco an imprint of Harper Collins
  • Format: Hardback
  • pages: 305
  • Source: bookstore!
  • 3 stars

I like this book for a lot of reasons, but I think the biggest one is the ghosts. Did I mention that this is a ghost story? No? Well, it’s a ghost story. But these ghost are free floating, chain rattling ghosts. These ghosts, Alice and Sandra,  are embedded in the house. The are everywhere, and they crowd each other. They whisper to each other and the inhabitants almost hear them. They are uncomfortable and make the inhabitants uncomfortable, too.

Minna and Trenton return to the haunted house to clean it and pack up the beings of their recently deceased father. Amy, Minna’s daughter, and Caroline, Minna and Trenton’s mother, join them in this endeavor. Naturally, all of this stirs up bitter feelings between the adults and give the ghosts plenty to discuss as well. This book is not chock full of horror, but instead full of the regrets of everyone living and dead within the house. It’s a nice read for someone who wants to read a ghost story, just not a Stephen King or Peter Straub ghost story.